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When it comes to cloud storage, there are many standards out there in the market. For example, Amazon S3 is the leader and many are using S3 API to create a S3-clone service. Rackspace Cloud Files and OpenStack are trying to create its own standard by giving away the software to open source community. Microsoft has its own standard in Azure Storage, incorporating Table storage and SQL storage, in addition to blob storage.  There are also other technology heavy-weights that are trying to setup CDMI as the cloud computing standard. In this race, every party has a different edge. For example, Amazon is expanding S3 API to include support for IAM (Identity and Account Management) with its edge in offering the most maturing and most adopted services in its platform. OpenStack has an edge in Open Source, which potentially can be adopted by many organizations looking to h... (more)

Ways Cloud Computing Will Change by 2020

Think cloud computing is just the latest IT fad? Think again. Forrester predicts the global cloud computing market will grow from $35 billion in 2011 to around $150 billion by 2020 as it becomes key to many organizations' IT infrastructures. According to an article on ZDNet, by 2020 cloud is going to be a major - and permanent - part of the enterprise computing infrastructure. By 2020, a generational shift will have occurred in organizations. A new generation of CIOs will be in charge that have grown up using cloud-based tools, making them far more willing to adopt cloud on an enterprise scale. With these developments in mind, here are 10 ways in which the cloud of 2020 will look radically different to the way it does today, according to ZDNet. Rackspace Open Cloud Offers Easily Scalable Computing Rackspace has announced the unlimited availability of cloud databases and ... (more)

Rackspace Hosting Named “Platinum Plus Sponsor” of Cloud Expo New York

Cloud Expo New York $500 Savings here! SYS-CON Events announced today that Rackspace Hosting, the open cloud company, has been named "Platinum Plus Sponsor" of SYS-CON's 12th International Cloud Expo, which will take place on June 10-13, 2013, at the Javits Center in New York City, New York. Explore Cloud Expo Sponsorship & Exhibit Opportunities ! Rackspace® Hosting (NYSE: RAX) is the open cloud company, delivering open technologies and powering more than 205,000 customers worldwide. Rackspace provides its renowned Fanatical Support® across a broad portfolio of IT products, including Public Cloud, Private Cloud, Hybrid Hosting and Dedicated Hosting. Rackspace has been recognized by Bloomberg BusinessWeek as a Top 100 Performing Technology Company, is featured on Fortune's list of 100 Best Companies to Work For and is included on the Dow Jones Sustainability Index. ... (more)

Hybrid Clouds: Private vs. Public, Revisited

We’ve written extensively about the benefits of hybrid clouds, since it’s a core part of our founding vision at CloudSwitch.  For most of this past year, the cloud market has been focused on defining the differences between public and private clouds and weighing the costs and benefits. Slowly the conversation has shifted to what we believe is the central axiom of cloud: it’s not all or nothing on-premise or in an external cloud; it’s the ability to federate across multiple pools of resources, matching application workloads to their most appropriate infrastructure environments. To reiterate some key thoughts we’ve written about in the past, the idea of hybrid clouds encompasses several use cases: Using multiple clouds for different applications to match business needs. For example, Amazon or Rackspace could be used for applications that need large horizontal scale, a... (more)

Cloud Computing Aided Resiliency in Wake of Sandy

Hurricane Sandy brought with it a heavy dose of disaster, but utilizing the cloud helped mitigate what could have been even more difficulties faced by businesses. "Overall, I think cloud does help," said Stephanie Balaouras, an analyst at Forrester Research. "Tier one cloud and SaaS providers such as Google and Amazon operate their cloud services from multiple data centers and can simply shift workloads to other locations as needed. They are also able to deliver a level of availability that many organizations could never achieve themselves. This includes the resiliency of the data center infrastructure itself to the resources that they invest in high availability and disaster recovery capabilities," Balaouras said, according to an article on SearchCloudSecurity.com. "Cloud computing can absolutely help in BC/DR operations," said Kevin O'Shea, information security ... (more)

Cloud Conversations: Gaining Cloud Confidence | Part 1

This is the first of a two-part industry trends and perspectives series looking at how to learn from cloud outages (read part II here). In case you missed it, there were some public cloud outages during the recent Christmas 2012-holiday season. One incident involved Microsoft Xbox (view the Microsoft Azure status dashboard here) users were impacted, and the other was another Amazon Web Services (AWS) incident. Microsoft and AWS are not alone, most if not all cloud services have had some type of incident and have gone on to improve from those outages. Google has had issues with different applications and services including some in December 2012 along with a Gmail incident that received covered back in 2011. For those interested, here is a link to the AWS status dashboard and a link to the AWS December 24 2012 incident postmortem. In the case of the recent AWS incide... (more)

Cloud Computing and 4G: Perfect Together

Just as a team is only as strong as its weakest player, the more robust a mobile broadband service, the more beneficial it is to accessing and running applications in the cloud. There's a strong connection between cloud computing services and mobile broadband, including 4G services. Mobile broadband provides a connection to anyone anywhere within its coverage area. And the latest mobile broadband technology, Long Term Evolution (LTE), often referred to as 4G, provides a mobile broadband connection that is sufficiently fast for most cloud applications, according to an article on CFOWorld.com. A Canadian consultancy, Maravedis, put forth a study called "4G + Cloud = Innovation & Profits?" It focused on "how 4G wireless combined with cloud computing will drive a new wave of innovation and ROI for operator content, services and applications." It identified the main c... (more)

Going Green with Cloud Computing

Calling it a full-fledged tree-hugger may be a slight overstatement, but cloud computing is being viewed as an eco-friendly service that reduces the number of machines and the carbon footprint of enterprises. Thanks to virtualization and server utilization rates of around 60-70 percent, large, shared data centers are usually able to employ fewer physical machines to achieve the same capacity as an equivalent number of in-house data centers, according to an article on GreenerIdeal.com. Large data centers can also dynamically allocate resources where they're needed, where individual enterprises must often buy more machines than they need to handle peak data loads. This reduction in physical servers means less energy expended in running, cooling, manufacturing, transporting, and replacing these machines, and that can mean big savings over time. In fact, it's estimated ... (more)

A Series of Unfortunate Events By @LMacVittie | @DevOpsSummit [#DevOps]

A Series of Unfortunate (Delivery) Events 79% of new products miss their launch date. That was the conclusion of a CGT/Sopheon Survey in which the impact of such market misses were also explored. What it didn't dig into was the reason why so many products and projects miss their launch date. When we start digging into the details with respect to applications, we can find at least one causal factor in the delivery process, specifically that portion which focuses on the actual move into production, from which consumers (internal and external) are ultimately able to get their hands on the product they desire: your app. This is tied to a lexical misinterpretation (or perhaps misapplication) of the word "delivery" in "continuous delivery". Continuous delivery as used by developers and DevOps alike really means delivery to an application's penultimate destination. Not the... (more)

BusinessWeek Piece on Cloud Computing Misses The Point

Steve Hamm (@stevehamm31) of BusinessWeek - pictured below -got a big article on #cloudcomputing into last week’s issue.  It rightly points out that cloud computing is the big thing and will keep us busy for the next 10 years.  Unfortunately, a lot of the article is misleading or missing key context. His first example cited is Avon’s use of a smartphone- and PC-accessible system for connecting Avon’s 150,000 “sales leaders” with their reps (sales leaders are the consultants who recruit and run other consultants/reps and get a cut of the “upline” commission).  Nothing in the article explains how this is a “cloud computing” solution.  Remote/mobile accessible applications have been around almost as long as the Internet.  The article doesn’t say, but I suspect that the system serving up all this info is a traditionally developed and deployed one sitting inside the Avo... (more)

Regional Cloud Computing Providers

One of the oft discussed business challenges of cloud-based application deployments – or any remote app deployment where a service has to communicate over the public internet – is latency. It takes more time to fetch data when a request has to leave the LAN, and latency is usually variable and at the mercy of both the Interwebs and the cloud provider. This isn’t so much of an issue when your entire app is deployed in the cloud and users are going directly there for data; the user won’t notice any difference between accessing your app after it’s moved to AWS than they did when you had it deployed in your own data center. In fact some times it might even be faster. The latency monster rears its ugly head when apps are spread across data centers, either in a split architecture or with bursting, where the user is first directed to your local data center and then a deci... (more)